Skip to content

Family Sailing: La Turbie, French Riviera

June 7, 2013

Being stuck in a port has its advantages and yesterday we locked up First Essential and took a trip up the mountains to the Roman village of La Turbie. Getting there is no mean feat without a car and involved a bus to Monaco, anther bus up the wiggly mountain road, a different bus with an Italian driver back down the wiggly road to Monaco, a bus back to the boat, a lot of guess work and a bit of luck! However, it was definitely worth it.

The trophy

The trophy

La Turbie was famous in Roman times for its monument, The Trophy of Augustus built by Augustus to celebrate his victory over the Ligurian tribes (45 in total). Louis XIV destroyed most of the trophy in the 18th Century and the stone was used to build the surrounding houses in the village. The ruins were then used as a quarry but when the County of Nice became part of France in 1860, the trophy was listed as an historic monument and plans for restoration began. It was restored to its current state by the end of 1933 by Formigé.

Restored columns

Restored columns

Inner structure

Inner structure

Standing tall

Standing tall

The trophy was built on the highest point of the Via Julia which Augustus had built to facilitate trading with Gaul. It overlooks San Remo in Italy on the East side and all the way down to the Esterel massif in the West, a symbol of the power and protection afforded by Rome.

The view to Italy

The view to Italy

Looking down to the Esterel massif

Looking down to the Esterel massif

The town itself is interesting and the old town has its own little bit of history. A small house on a famous street claims to be where Napoleon slept for a night and also the shelter of the Prince of Monaco during the Castelan Siege!

IMG_2922

 

The Prince stayed here!

The Prince stayed here!

 

Napoleon slept here!

Napoleon slept here!

The house in the street

The house in the street

 

Although not as big as the neighbouring town of Eze, La Turbie has many more inhabitants and is less geared towards tourists. We had a delicious lunch at very reasonable prices in the town square where the market had been that morning. We also found the bakery and sampled an unusual local pastry. They had a choice of fillings; pistache, citron, vanille, Nutella, cappucino… I resisted the Nutella and went for vanilla. They were delicious and I have no idea what they are called!

Yummy!

Yummy!

We also had a look in the church and were treated to a private concert! An octet of two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons and 2 French horns were having a run through of their programme for the following night. It was certainly an unexpected treat.

Private concert for two!

Private concert for two!

A fabulous town for exploring, enjoying the views, and a bit of history.

The church

The church

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: